Category: Long Term Care Planning

Talk to Your Parents About Their Financial Plans

Most older adults come from a generation that believes certain financial matters are best kept private.  In many cases, your parents may have met with an attorney or financial advisor and tell you that ‘everything is handled.’  It may even be awkward to talk to your parents about financial plans.  However, the guidance they received… Continued

Is Your Family Inheritance at Risk for Probate?

If a family member dies, it is important to have a will in place but a will may not protect the family’s inheritance from probate, taxes, or creditors such as Medicaid.  Here are some considerations for ensuring that your family will receive their fair share of assets and how to preserve their inheritance during the… Continued

An Overview of Life Estate Deeds in Maryland

If you own real estate in Maryland, it is important to consider and make informed decisions about these types of assets. A life estate deed can be a valuable tool to help you legally pass your real property assets to your heirs and avoid the probate process, while also preserving tax benefits.  This type of… Continued

Long Term Planning Is Critical Right Now

Today’s COVID crisis has heightened our awareness of the unexpected. If you are over 60, or are caring for a senior or parent, you are no doubt in the midst of crisis management. This can be a tough time, requiring tough decisions, especially if long-term care is required.  Unfortunately, many families are not properly prepared… Continued

Medicaid Planning Tips for Seniors and Their Families

When we talk about Medicaid planning, many people think that this is something that only needs to be considered for underprivileged people.  Quite the opposite is true.  Medicaid planning, sometimes also referred to as long-term care planning, is important for anyone that is going to need long-term care.  It is especially important for family members… Continued

FAQs About Long Term Care Planning

According to government statistics, a person who turns 65 years old today will have a 70 percent chance of needing long term care, at some point, during their remaining years. Women, on average, receive 3.7 years of long-term care, while men receive 2.2 years. Moving into a long-term care home or facility can be daunting.… Continued